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Most pastors are able to create their own schedules, and that may lead some to feel that they need to be visible around the office as much as possible. After all, we don’t want to give the impression that we’re not working. 

While we want to be responsible with our time and available to our people, time to be alone is vital. As I noted on Friday, I often went off site to work on my sermon. Those hours were part of the “regular office hours” I put in. I just moved my office to another location. You should feel free to do the same. Last Friday’s post was intended to give some examples.  

Today I want to encourage those of you who are just finding your way as preachers to carefully consider the shape your preaching will take. I would like to commend the expository method of preaching that takes a book of the Bible and teaches it over an appropriate number of weeks as opposed to preaching a series of topical messages. 

Preaching should primarily focus on teaching people about God and our relationship to him. If we don’t have that as our primary aim, our focus will be on teaching people about us and how we relate to God. I believe there is a difference not only in how we approach the Bible, but in where we end up in our thinking about God.

When you take a book of the Bible and preach through it, you are exposing your people to the Bible as it was written. God did not give us the Bible in an encyclopedia format. Remember that our preaching shows our people how to read the Bible. If all they hear are series of sermons about them, they’ll be approaching Scripture that way. As a result the are likely to miss developing a deeper understanding of God and the Gospel along the way. 

There are exceptions, but a topical series is often going to apply to only a segment of your congregation. But if you preach through Philippians, there’s not a person in your auditorium who will be neglected in your sermons. I’ll even say that expository preaching – done right – is more practical and relevant than preaching topic after topic of our own choosing.

A series on raising kids or discovering your life purpose may appear more relevant and sound more appealing than a series on “Colossians.” But I’m concerned that a lack of systematic preaching will leave us with churches and Christians who cannot navigate an increasingly hostile culture. Just my two cents, but give it some thought.

Preaching through Bible books also helps your people to get a balanced diet. It lets God set the agenda for your preaching and frees you from having to come up with the next exciting topic. When people used to ask me when I would be speaking on a specific topic, I explained that I would do that when it came up in the text. If you are properly preaching through both Old Testament and New Testament books, history and letters, poetry and prophecy, eventually you cover a multitude of subjects that you might not even come close to if you major on topical preaching. 

The Bible doesn’t tell us how to choose our approach to preaching. But doesn’t it make sense to present it to our people the way it has been presented to us? Don’t neglect the occasional topical series or sermon. But let your choice of what to preach be shaped primarily by a desire to encounter God and what he has done for us, and then by how it “applies.”

For further reading, let me recommend Mark Dever’s book Preach.

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